Archive: » 2013 » January

Happy 2013 – Our album is out!

After months of hard work, we’re spinning our CD sitting here on Bailando. Surreal to say the least. It’s a wonderful feeling to have completed such a monumental project in every respect, almost on schedule, definitely not on budget.

We call our songwriting duo it goes without saying. The album is called We Herd Rumors – with a whopping 14 songs it’s pretty diverse, yet definitely an album. We’ve already heard some beautiful stories about how the music is slowly finding it own life in others’ daily existence.

You can go to our website at www.itgoeswithoutsayingmusic.com and stream any and all songs for free. You can also download the music at iTunes, Amazon and elsewhere on the net. If you’d like to have the actual CD with lyrics, album notes and photos, order the CD with CD Baby.

So, start your New Year with New Tunes, and we hope you enjoy both.

Linda and Ricardo

Final days in the Rio

August 2012

We don’t actually have a lot of time here in the Rio before we need to take the 6-hour bus ride to the city, stay a night at Las Torres, and finally hop on the plane to Miami, our first stop on our way to record the album in upstate NY. But we use the time well, saying goodbye to friends, doing a couple live gigs, and getting Bailando ready for the sedentary life-style that we have planned for her for 3 months.

Our trip starts out well. Thematically, we decide to make it all about music, so why not have the local trio sing us a song while we dine in Guatemala City?

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Up the Rio to Mango

August 2012

We make it in one piece, nap, eat and check in to Guatemala. Then, the supreme treat of going up the Rio Dulce – a spectacular ride.

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Going back to Guatemala

July 2012

We set up the schedule such that we can leave for Guatemala as soon as weather permits following Stefania’s visit. It turns out the weather is great the day she leaves, so we leave too. We stop in Utila to check out of Honduras, fuel up and then launch on an over-nighter to Livingston, Guatemala. We’re on schedule; it’s July 30th and the flight is on August 9th. Everything is great on the crossing, including the lightning storm that threatens all night, and finally hits us just before dawn off Cabo Tres Puntas. The storm we rode arriving at dawn last year was great too – it was essentially the same day of the year, August 1st.

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Exploring above and below water with Stefania

July 2012

We get in the dinghy and head north, then east along Roatan’s northern coast. This is where we went for the shipwreck dive, but today we go much farther. We discover different bights, lagoons, spectacular landscape features, and even a dolphin tourist attraction that came out of nowhere. Our outing ends with a simple snorkeling dip. Then, she leaves, back to Caracas, hell on earth (except for the cocadas, arepas, hallacas, and all the other ahhhhs…)

Stefania, it’s very nice to have you here, enjoying life on Bailando; we’re so glad you could visit with us.

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We Take Stefania on the Walk to West Bay

July 2012

We’re excited to take Stefania on the coastal walk to West Bay – we’ve done it once before and are happy to take it again, especially because the snorkeling at the far end is spectacular. It’d be good for her to see the resorts, the beach, the vibe and also enjoy a nice dip into a whole other world.

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From French Cay to West End with Stefania

July 2012

We don’t have a lot of time with Stefania so we plan on going for a day sail to Cayos Cochinos, stay a night or two, and then return to West End where we can have a taxi take her to the airport. We make a pitstop at Brooksy Point before heading to sea. The gods just don’t believe in this plan and proceed to foul up the main sail roller furler… so we decide to head directly to West End and make the best of it.

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Stefania Comes to Visit – French Cay

July 2012

Ricardo’s cousin from Venezuela, Stefania, arrives to Roatan to get into relax mode. We quickly fall into true Venezuelan spirit and drink, eat and celebrate nothing more than this moment, this momentous visit, our valued guest.

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Tapping into French Cay Harbor

July 2012

We go to a cruiser potluck at Brooksy Point, watch the finals of the European Cup and continue to have a blast recording our songs. Then Linda gets a bright idea and suddenly everything changes…

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Settling into French Cay Harbor

July 2012

Well, now we begin living here so this is just about going to meet the local market, making a phone call to Nonna, meeting neighbors, cooking, eating and living slowly.

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Moving on to French Cay

July 2012

Without potable water aboard, we’re eager to fix the situation… that means lugging 5 gallon bottles aboard, or going to a spot where we can fill up with a hose. So, we radio with other cruisers in the area and find there’s just the right spot in French Cay harbor. We buddy boat with Nauti-Nauti, motoring eastward along the southern coast of Roatan. And we finally get water…

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Life and Times in French Cay Harbor

July 2012

We say goodbye to our friends on Nauti-Nauti and on the trawler extraordinaire, Peking. They are heading to the Rio Dulce for the height of the hurricane season. We then settle-in and start recording again in ernest. We’ve been planning to spend the whole season in Honduras… but Linda’s sudden idea of going to a real studio has us flip-flopping once again. It’s our favorite state of mind. We do make the decision to record in a studio, but where should we go…

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At Home in West End – Music and Potable Water

June-July 2012

In typical fashion, we settle in and get down to routine. Mostly music, but we also take on a two-headed monster… potable water.

One fine morning, we find that we don’t have any potable water left in our tanks… if you remember we filled up about a week ago in Utila before coming here – that’s 350 gallons of water. So, believe it or not, this is actually good news. The bilge pump has been going off – always a worrisome thing to hear – and we’ve been sulking over the very real possibility that we sprung a leak in the rudder post when we dragged anchor in Utila and came to within a foot of the dinghy dock. All you need is one good slam of the rudder onto the seafloor and you get a hairline crack in the fiberglass. And the seas were slamming that morning… Indeed, we’re so sullen and convinced of having sprung a leak on an old wound that we haven’t even tasted the water in the bilge to verify the kind of leak we’re nurturing – we figure there’s not much we can do about cracks around the rudder post right now…

That’s until we run out of potable water. So, we immediately do the taste test: salty = hull leak… sweet = plumbing leak. Now you see why it’s good news to have no potable water left. Yes, it’s a hassle for a few days, but we can at least do something about it. Therein begins a renewed effort to fix the watermaker so we can replenish our supply – we have a step-by-step “how-to” below. And we also track down the leak to the aft shower valve and do the necessary by-pass surgery in the plumbing line until we can replace the faulty valve. We tame one of the monster’s heads, but the other remains out of our control…

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Coastline Walk to West Bay

June 2012

West Bay is where a lot of resorts are located – it’s a little more than two miles south of us. It has a beautiful white-sand beach, if also tourists and peddlers. We love walking so this trek has been on our minds from the first day – we’re enticed seeing both locals and visitors walking along the coast from our perch aboard Bailando. Today we go.

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Diving a Wreck Site

June 2012

We’re enticed by the many dive sites here in Roatan – there’s a very good book that beautifully illustrates each in great detail – but this one site caught our eye almost immediately – a ship wreck. Whereas we can take our dinghy and tie up at the respective mooring and do the dive on our own, we decide it’s better to go with West End Divers – besides safety, there’s other benefits that reduce the toil of diving, like having roadies. But, we’re not technically certified for such a deep dive (even though we’ve been down to 90 feet before, during the whale shark dive), so we have to do a little open-book test to qualify. We prove smart-enough and ace it, so off we go… down to the land of hydrogen narcosis…

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